Should you avoid idioms when writing for translation?

You are searching for a translator, or you are (almost) ready to use one. You might have read several guidelines and suggestions on how to write your English copy with translation in mind, to make your translator’s job easier, including: don’t use idioms, noun strings, complex verbs, and contractions; avoid passive/complex sentences and specialized jargon; keep sentences short; and others....
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Why there are so many English words in your translation

After you have ordered a translation, you might be surprised to find out that in your translated material many words have not been translated. Why’s that? Many factors come into play, including the spread of the English language worldwide, the speed at which neologisms are created in the US in many fields, both technical and non-technical, and the brevity of many English phrases as well as...
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Move travelers but please don’t “movimentare viaggiatori”

A couple days ago I was glancing at a renowned brochure on clients education, written originally in English, and for the first time I thought about taking a look at its official Italian translations. The Italian translation is generally good, however, at some point I couldn’t help notice a funny slip by the translator: The original “Each year, London’s Heathrow Airport moves over 65 million...
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Consistency, More Than Meets The Eye

Every translator knows, or learns soon, that consistency is of paramount importance. And not just in translation, but in any kind of technical document. I remember reading a revealing comment on this regard by Don Bush in his well-regarded column “The Friendly Editor” on Intercom, the magazine of the Society of Technical Communication. (Unfortunately the column has ended, after several years....
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